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Improving Your Storytelling - Excerpts

by Doug Lipman

From Improving Your Storytelling:
Beyond the Basics for All Who Use Stories in Work or Play

  1. Excerpt from Section Five
  2. TOP OF PAGE

TOP OF PAGE

1. Excerpt from Section Five

The premise of this book is that you, the storyteller, will tell a story best when you continue to shape it and to respond to your listeners as you tell. You will create a dynamic balance - taking into account the nature of the transfer of imagery - among the demands of the storyteller, the listeners, and the story.

Each component of the storytelling event has been explored in previous chapters. In the end, however, the components are only important insofar as they contribute to the overall effect of the storytelling event. In the end, the successful storytelling event is an indivisible whole.

How do you combine the parts to make the whole work? That is the subject of this final section.

The next chapter introduces an amazing tool - namely, your attention: what you think about as you tell. Your attention shifts spontaneously from one component to another. It usually moves just where it is needed to help integrate the complex mechanics of your storytelling. Fortunately, there are ways to free your attention when it is blocked from moving flexibly.

The subsequent chapter shows how you can direct your attention in a way that helps connect each moment in a story to your overall goals for the storytelling event. In some cases this connection will require discovering only a single concept; in others, it will require drawing on all your knowledge of the storytelling triangle.

Finally, the concluding chapter takes up the mystery of transformation - the sometimes elusive result of perfect balance among all the components of the storytelling event.

TOP OF PAGE

2. Table Of Contents

of Improving Your Storytelling.

Introduction: Storytelling Basics and Beyond
Section 1: The Transfer Of Imagery
Chapter 1: Oral Language
Chapter 2: Forms of Imagery
Chapter 3: Imagining Fully
Chapter 4: Kinesthetic Imagery and Characterization
Section 2: Your Relationship To The Story
Chapter 5: What Is A Story?
Chapter 6: Learning The Story
Chapter 7: Discovering The Meaning
Chapter 8: Discovering The Structure
Chapter 9: Memorizing
Section 3: Your Relationship To Your Listeners
Chapter 10: Helper And Beneficiary
Chapter 11: The Four Tasks
Chapter 12: Your Effect On Your Listeners
Chapter 13: Program Planning
Chapter 14: Developing Audiences For Your Needs
Section 4: Your Relationship To Your Self
Chapter 15: Your Voice
Chapter 16: Performance Anxiety
Chapter 17: Your Support Team
Section 5: Putting It All Together
Chapter 18: The Flexible Shifting Of Attention
Chapter 19: Balancing The Details With The Goals
Conclusion: Transformation

Appendix
How to Find Storytelling Organizations and Publications
Notes
Bibliography
Index

Return to other information about Improving Your Storytelling.

TOP OF PAGE

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This page was last updated on Friday, November 28, 2003
Copyright©1998 Doug Lipman